Friday, March 24, 2017

John Hall Fulton to Sarah Buchanan Campbell Preston, December 11, 1828

[John Hall Fulton at Richmond to Sarah Buchanan Campbell Preston at Abingdon, Virginia, December 11, 1828. Box 29, Folder 7, Robert Morton Hughes Papers, Special Collections and University Archives, Patricia W. and J. Douglas Perry Library, Old Dominion University Libraries, Norfolk, VA 23529. This is my rough transcription. Instances of the "long s" in the original have been modernized and paragraph breaks added for easier reading.]

Dr. Madam

I was a few days since intrusted [entrusted] with a Secret with an Injunction not to propagate it -- an Injunction which I have extreme difficulty to comply with, and as all will be consumated [consummated] before this reaches you, I deem it no violation of confidence to send it to your fire side. 

Judge Johnston is here, about ten days ago he met with a Miss Bernard at Judge Cabel's [Cabell's] it was the first time he had ever seen her. In a day or two afterwards he courted her; in a day or two thereafter they concluded upon a marriage contract, and, if there is no flying off, they will be married between this and [T]uesday, for on that day he intends to set out for home.

Miss Bernard is said to be an estimable woman, and has lived in the world a little more than half a century, I know nothing of her family or fortune, except that she is the sister of Mrs. Copeland of this place.

If you have ever in the course of your life observed the influence of Love, you can form a remote Idea of the Judge's actions, he speaks freely to Keller & myself [and] every Topic other than Miss Bernard, is without interest, he talks incessantly of his Girl, his sweetheart. The fate of contending nations, national & state politics, friends & loss of friends, are all secondary matters, and that Interest which under other circumstances he would feel in those subjects is now lost in the contemplation of the delectable Miss Bernard.

Richmond is dull and promises to be so during the winter. In the Legislature we anticipate much excitement, on the subject of a convention, the different local interests are beginning to be developed, and there is too much reason to appr[ehen]d that the conflicting interests of the different sections of the state, will result in the indulgence of much bad feeling among us.

Miss Lorraine's "Donald Adair" is out. It is read here with some Interest, and is really a work of much merit. I will send the young Ladies a copy by the first oppt'y. I hope they will read it and pray for Miss Lorraine's success.

I hope Miss Sally has recovered & that you are all enjoying Health & Happiness.

                                                                   J. H. Fulton

[John Hall Fulton (1792-1836), brother of Andrew Steele Fulton (1800-1884).
Sarah Buchanan Campbell Preston (1778-1846)
Judge Johnston = Peter Johnston, Jr. (1763-1831)
Miss Bernard = Peter married Ann Nancy Bernard (1775-1865) in Richmond on December 13, 1828 (his second wife). Elizabeth Ann Bernard Wills (1778-1862), one of Ann's sisters, was a consort of John Allan (1779-1834), with whom she had "natural" twin sons. Allan, a wealthy, Scottish-born merchant based in Richmond, was also Edgar Allan Poe's (1809-1849) estranged foster father. 
Judge Cabel = Judge William Henry Cabell (1772-1853)
Mrs. Copeland = Hennigham C. Bernard Copland (1781-1838) was the second wife of Charles Copland (1756-1836) of Richmond, and sister of Ann Nancy Bernard and Elizabeth Ann Bernard Wills. 
Keller = ?
A. M. Lorraine, Donald Adair (2 volumes). Richmond: Peter Cottom, 1828.
Miss Sally = Sarah "Sally" Buchanan Preston (1802-1879).]

[Many thanks to Sue Davis, William Myers, Mary Davy and Sally Young for their ongoing research collaboration.]
  

Thursday, March 23, 2017

Charles Clement Johnston to Eliza Madison Preston Johnston, October 26, 1828

[Charles Clement Johnston at Wythe Court House to Eliza Madison Preston Johnston at Abingdon, Virginia, October 26, 1828, Postmarked October 27, 1828. Box 25, Folder 5, Robert Morton Hughes Papers, Special Collections and University Archives, Patricia W. and J. Douglas Perry Library, Old Dominion University Libraries, Norfolk, VA 23529. This is my rough transcription. Instances of the "long s" in the original have been modernized and paragraph breaks added for easier reading.]

My Dearest Love

I write only to say that I am here quite well -- the fatigue of travelling in the stage did not prove in any degree injurious to me. I shall leave this place as soon as I can quit my business for I cannot support the anxiety I feel about you when absent. I am made much easier by hearing from you both yesterday & today. 

I thank you my dearest for following my wishes so faithfully in attending to the remedies prescribed.

I hope Sue will be kind enough to write to me by every mail. If you get more unwell, I beg you to apprize me of it immediately and I will instantly break away from every thing else to be with you.

Present my kindest greetings to Susan & your Mama & believe me as ever your fond & anxious husband

                                                               Chs. C. Johnston

Your Uncle Frank went on to Botetourt last evening. 

[Eliza Madison Preston Johnston (1803-November 27, 1828) married Charles Clement Johnston (1795-1832), at Greenfield, on December 29, 1822. 
Sue/Susan = Susanna (Susan) Smith Preston (1805-1857)
Your Mama = (stepmother) Elizabeth Ann Carrington Preston (1768-1839)
Uncle Frank = Francis Smith Preston (1765-1836).]

[Many thanks to Sue Davis, William Myers, Mary Davy and Sally Young for their ongoing research collaboration.]


Wednesday, March 22, 2017

Charles Clement Johnston: Last Will and Testament, 1827 and 1832

[Charles Clement Johnston: Last Will and Testament, February 2, 1827 and exhibited in court, August 27, 1832. From a copy provided by Sue Davis from will books, Washington County Court House, Abingdon, Virginia, pages 263-264.]

I Charles C. Johnston do make and ordain this to be my last Will and Testament.


Imprimus.


I direct the land I purchased of Vance Acklin, to be sold, all my personal property, not retained by my wife to be also sold, and the proceeds derived therefrom, as well as from the collection of all debts due me, to be applied as soon as practicable to the payment of all my just debts.


I direct the land I purchased from the Trustees of the Abingdon Academy to be also sold, in such a way as is possible to discharge the purchase money thereof.


I devise my House & Lotts I purchased of Henry St. John Dixon, with all their appurtenances together with the lotts purchased, of Willoughby to Wife as long as she chooses to reside thereon. When she removes permanently elsewhere I direct them to be sold, the one third of the purchase money remaining after the payment of my debts, if it should be necessary to apply any of it to that purpose, to my wife, the remaining two thirds to be equally divided among my children.


I also devise to my wife such of my personal property as she chooses to retain, without her being required to account therefor.


As I presume she will not continue to keep house where we live, I earnestly recommend her, to reside with my father, to whose protection she is confidently committed, where she would not only have a safe abode, but would contribute greatly to render his home comfortable to him. In that event I would advise a sale of all the household furniture.


I  give to my nephew John W. Johnston the rifle gun and its accoutrements which his father gave me.


I give to my brother Beverly R. Johnston my patent Server [Silver?] watch, he paying therefor to my estate forty dollars. The conditions of my family will be such as not to allow me to make it more liberally that is the only reason, and I am sure it will be a sufficient one, that I do not remember my other friends.


I hereby invest my Executors hereafter named with full and unlimited power and discretion, to sell the above described real and personal property, at any time, and in any manner, whether privately or publickly, for cash, or on credit, which they might think most conducive to the interest of my estate, hereby investing the, to make deeds with general warranty, if the same should be required, for the conveyance of such real estate, so as to bind my heirs.


I hearby appoint my kind and trusty friend John H. Fulton and my brother Beverly R. Johnston excrs of this my Last Will and Testament.


In Testimony whereof, I hereunto set my hand and seal this 2nd day of February 1827.


signed as the Last Will and Testament              Chs. C. Johnston SS 

of Chs. C. Johnston, in the presence of us.
Jeremiah Bronaugh
B. R. Johnston

At a Court held for Washington County the 27th day of August 1832.


The last Will and Testament of Charles C. Johnston deceased was exhibited in court and proved by the oath of Jeremiah Bronaugh a subscribing witness thereto and ordered to be recorded. And on the motion of John H. Fulton and Beverly R. Johnston the executors therein named who took the oath of an executor prescribed by law and entered into and acknowledged their bond in the sum of Ten thousand dollars with James White, John S. Preston, John M. Preston, John D. Mitchell and William K. Trigg their securities conditioned as the law directs. A Certificate is therefore granted them for the probate of the said Will in due form.


                                     Teste

                                     Jacob Lynch, D. C.  

[Eliza Madison Preston Johnston (1803-November 27, 1828) married Charles Clement Johnston (1795-1832), at Greenfield, on December 29, 1822. 
John Preston Johnston (1824-1847) was born on February 1, 1824. Eliza Mary Johnston (1825-1909) was born on July 3, 1825. 

Her sister Susan Louise (or Louisa) Johnston was born in December 1826 and died on September 23, 1827. 
Vance Acklin = James Vance Acklin (born 1780). The Acklin family owned a tavern in Abingdon, still standing. There is a picture of it here.
Henry St. John Dixon (1773-1846)John Warfield Johnston (1818-1889)
My father = Peter Johnston, Jr. (1763-1831)

His father = Dr. John Warfield Johnston (1790-1818)
Beverly Randolph Johnston (1803-1876)
John H. Fulton = John Hall Fulton (1792-1836), brother of Andrew Steele Fulton (1800-1884).
Jeremiah Bronaugh (born 1802)
James White (1770-1838). Family papers, including some additional Johnston information, here.
John S. Preston = John Smith Preston (1809-1881)
John M. Preston = John Montgomery Preston (1788-1861)
John D. Mitchell = John Davis Mitchell (1799-1859)
William K. Trigg = William King Trigg (1807-1877)
Jacob Lynch (1798-1862), Clerk of Court since 1830. 
No specific mention is made of enslaved servants Dolly Claibourn, Franky or any other people who were classified as part of Charles' "personal property."]

[Many thanks to Sue Davis, William Myers, Mary Davy and Sally Young for their ongoing research collaboration.]